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With elections one year away, Office of Government Relations prepares to launch civic engagement initiatives

Episcopal News Service - qui, 07/11/2019 - 16:10

The Episcopal Church’s Office of Government Relations is preparing for a contentious election season. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News Service

[Episcopal News Service] Nov. 3 marked the one-year countdown to the U.S. presidential and congressional elections, and The Episcopal Church’s Office of Government Relations is gearing up for a year that’s expected to see even more vitriol in public discourse than the rancorous 2016 election brought. And as debates over the church’s role in politics have intensified, so have OGR’s efforts to facilitate civil, respectful discussions about political issues across partisan boundaries.

The Office of Government Relations, based in Washington, D.C., directly across the street from the Capitol and the Supreme Court, exists to advocate for policy positions based on General Convention and Executive Council resolutions. It also educates and engages Episcopalians on those policy positions through the Episcopal Public Policy Network, which sends out action alerts for those looking for opportunities to get involved.

Over the past few years, OGR has been busy in the halls of Congress representing the church’s positions on a wide variety of specific issues, from refugee resettlement to drilling in the Arctic to gerrymandering to gun control and many more. As the election approaches, it’s focusing on ways that people can engage with these issues in a productive way, cast informed votes and ensure fair representation in Congress.

In addition to its usual advocacy work, OGR is “kicking off a civic engagement initiative that we’re breaking down into three parts,” said Alan Yarborough, OGR’s church relations officer.

The first part focuses on the 2020 Census, which will take place in the spring. The Episcopal Church is an official partner of the Census, which means OGR is working directly with the U.S. Census Bureau “to encourage people to take the census because we want the count to be as accurate as possible,” Yarborough told Episcopal News Service.

Census data is used to determine how government funds and services are distributed, so an accurate census count is necessary to ensure fair representation in government.

“The U.S. Census has profound impacts on not just our electoral system, but also how over 100 federal programs, and many other state and local initiatives, allocate funding and other resources to best serve the population,” Yarborough explained. And frequently, the groups needing those resources most are the hardest to count.

“Evidence shows that faith-based communities often have some of the closest connections to communities that are hard to count,” Yarborough said, which is why the Census Bureau is working with The Episcopal Church and other religious groups to spread the word. Within the next few weeks, OGR will start releasing an educational series on the census, explaining why it’s important and how it will work.

The second part is election engagement, which has long been a component of OGR’s work. This includes resources like the Vote Faithfully Toolkit, a guide for congregations that covers registering voters, getting voters to the polls and advocating for voting rights. It’s not a primer on specific issues or candidates, and OGR emphasizes that it is an entirely nonpartisan endeavor. The IRS prohibits churches and other nonprofit organizations from campaigning for or against particular candidates. However, churches are allowed to involve their members in advocating for policies they support, and to help them get registered to vote.

“The U.S. election is a chance to participate in our democratic process to elect officials that reflect the values we want our society to hold,” Yarborough told ENS.

The toolkit also offers liturgical resources that can be incorporated into a service to remind people of the moral importance of voting and allow for prayerful consideration of the topics at hand. The 2020 version of the Vote Faithfully Toolkit will also be released within the next few weeks, Yarborough said.

The third part is a new and expanded multi-week curriculum on civil discourse. Last year, recognizing how difficult it has become to have a political discussion in good faith with someone who holds different views, OGR developed a five-week group workshop that creates a framework for productive dialogue. Grounded in prayer and Scripture, the curriculum establishes an environment of mutual respect and guides participants through political discussions in ways that foster learning and understanding, rather than the kind of divisive, emotional arguments that have become more common.

“Civil discourse is a key component of our engagement in 2020. We want to equip Episcopalians, and all people, to be able to engage across political differences, especially with our fellow parishioners and community members,” Yarborough said. “We hope that the civil discourse curriculum can help Episcopalians to listen, to be aware of how their own messages are heard, and to allow us all to enrich our own thinking about different political perspectives and policy proposals.”

In OGR’s dealings with politicians, the response to its civil discourse efforts has been encouraging.

“The Office of Government Relations is well placed in the church to help us to speak across political difference,” the Rev. C.K. Robertson, canon to the presiding bishop for ministry beyond The Episcopal Church, told ENS. “In our meetings with legislators and policymakers in Washington, we have heard and seen the need for civil discourse. And we know that need extends across the country where many of our parishes and communities are already engaged in this crucial work.”

The new civil discourse curriculum will be an expanded version of last year’s, plus a few advanced sections, such as a training for facilitators. There will also be a video version and an online platform that allows individuals to take the course on their own, rather than as part of a parish group.

Although part of the idea behind the civil discourse curriculum is that it’s a framework that people of all political persuasions can unite behind, there has been some pushback on the concept of “civility” itself. On social media, some Episcopalians have reacted negatively, arguing that calls for civility are not an effective way to respond to an administration and political movement that embrace lies and white supremacist ideology and make threats of civil war.

Yarborough says he understands that view but draws a distinction between civil discourse and the mere idea of civility.

“We focus on civil discourse because it is useful when we are already in – or want to be in – conversation with our neighbors. It doesn’t apply in all circumstances, and it doesn’t mean we stop advocating for justice in all the ways we can. Civil discourse is a tool, and like any tool, it’s appropriate for certain applications. It’s not a prescription for solving any and every disagreement or injustice, but it is useful for leveraging our diversity in thought, perspective and identity to give us the best shot at solving problems in our society.”

– Egan Millard is an assistant editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at emillard@episcopalchurch.org.

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Canadian priest’s study finds gratitude can fight loneliness

Episcopal News Service - qua, 06/11/2019 - 17:48

[Anglican Journal] Prayers and other expressions of gratitude may hold significant potential in making people feel less lonely, a small study by a priest in the Anglican Church of Canada suggests.

Last summer and fall, the Rev. Eric Partridge, rector at the Anglican Church of St. Andrew in Sidney, British Columbia, paired six research volunteers from the church’s pastoral care team with six senior parishioners. Team members measured both their own and the seniors’ levels of loneliness using an assessment system employed by loneliness researchers (the UCLA Loneliness Scale) as well as a “narrative” assessment based on conversation between the volunteers and seniors. Then they met six times over the next 14 weeks to perform gratitude practices together. When researchers and seniors were assessed again at the end of the 14 weeks, all of the seniors and some of the researchers showed reduced levels of loneliness. The study also assessed participants’ levels of gratitude before and after the 14 weeks, Partridge says, and found similar results.

Read the full article here.

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Episcopal Church ‘still in’ despite Trump administration’s withdrawal from Paris climate pact

Episcopal News Service - ter, 05/11/2019 - 16:54

Members of the House of Bishops pose for a photo on Sept. 20, the final day of their fall meeting in Minneapolis, Minnesota, behind a banner supporting creation care. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News Service

[Episcopal News Service] The Trump administration announced on Nov. 4 that it would withdraw the United States from the global climate pact known as the “Paris agreement” within a year, but that won’t affect The Episcopal Church’s commitment to the agreement’s goal of stopping or slowing climate change.

“The Episcopal Church considers climate action part of fulfilling a sacred trust from God,” California Bishop Marc Andrus said in a written statement reacting to the Trump administration’s plan to withdraw, which he called “an irresponsible move that particularly threatens some of the world’s most vulnerable populations.”

Andrus, who has led Episcopal delegations in recent years to annual climate summits hosted by the United Nations, warned that delays in addressing climate change could produce catastrophic scenarios in both the short and long term. The hardest-hit communities “will continue to suffer the tragic effects of wildfires, sea level rise, heat waves, and other climate-related disasters,” he wrote.

An Episcopal delegation was in Paris, France, in December 2015 to make a spiritual case for climate action during the 21st Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, or COP. At that conference, member countries, including the United States, reached a landmark agreement to set voluntary goals aimed at keeping global warming well below 2 degrees Celsius, which scientists think would be necessary to prevent a spiraling catastrophe of melting glaciers, rising sea levels and related weather extremes.

The COP23 summit in 2017 was intended to build on the Paris agreement, but the agreement’s effectiveness was thrown into doubt when President Donald Trump said he would withdraw from the accord rather than hold the United States to its pledge to dramatically reduce its greenhouse gas emissions.

The Episcopal Church responded by joining the We Are Still In movement, a coalition of faith partners, governments, nongovernmental organizations and companies committed to continuing to work toward the Paris agreement’s goals.

Environmental justice is one of the church’s three main priorities, along with racial reconciliation and evangelism. Over the years, General Convention has passed numerous resolutions on the issue, whether supporting federal climate action or pledging to mitigate the church’s own impact on the environment.

In 2018, General Convention approved a resolution titled “Episcopalians Participating in Paris Climate Agreement” that called on Episcopalians and congregations to set examples “in the spirit of the Paris Climate Accord, by making intentional decisions about living lightly and gently on God’s good earth.”

Some of those individual decisions were collected by The Episcopal Church last spring through the church’s Creation Care Pledge, which coincided with Easter and Earth Day 2019. More than 1,000 people pledged to take steps to improve the environment and reduce their contributions to climate change.

California Bishop Marc Andrus, right, participates in a panel discussion in December 2018 at the United States Climate Action Center during COP24 in Poland. Photo: Lynnaia Main

Andrus’ diocese also has taken the lead in developing the online Carbon Tracker for Episcopalians to record and visualize the impact of their efforts. The diocese has nearly completed development of the tracker, and more than 800 households have participated so far in the test phase.

“For us, climate action means commitment to personal and local community transformation, advocacy for the best climate and environmental policies, and standing with those who are already experiencing the deep pain of climate-related displacement and loss,” Andrus said.

In 2016, The Episcopal Church was granted U.N. observer status, which allows members of the delegation to brief U.N. representatives on The Episcopal Church’s General Convention climate resolutions and to attend meetings in the official zone. Most recently, Andrus led a delegation representing Presiding Bishop Michael Curry to the COP24 summit in December 2018 in Katowice, Poland.

The United Nations’ COP25 summit had been scheduled for Dec. 2-13 in Santiago, Chile, but the country was forced to withdraw as host because of civil unrest tied to Chilean student protests over rail fares. Instead, the summit will be held in Madrid, Spain.

– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at dpaulsen@episcopalchurch.org.

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Central New York priest under investigation for alleged financial misconduct

Episcopal News Service - ter, 05/11/2019 - 16:10

[Episcopal News Service] An upstate New York priest accused of financial misconduct is now being investigated by law enforcement, according to the Diocese of Central New York, which announced on Oct. 31 that it had turned over the results of its own investigation to police.

The Rev. Joell Szachara. Photo: Diocese of Central New York

The Rev. Joell Szachara had been serving as the rector of St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church in New Hartford, New York, but resigned at the direction of Bishop DeDe Duncan-Probe, the diocese said in late September. At that time, Duncan-Probe placed Szachara on administrative leave, restricting her from engaging in ministry, while a forensic audit was conducted on the finances of St. Stephen’s.

With the audit complete, the diocese – which did not specify the type of financial wrongdoing Szachara has been accused of – referred the case to law enforcement as it continues its own investigation through the Title IV disciplinary process, Duncan-Probe wrote in an Oct. 31 letter to the clergy and wardens of her diocese.

“In this diocese, we have a shared commitment to transparency and accountability, acting in ways that honor the sacred trust of being a community of faith,” Duncan-Probe wrote. “While there may be times when that trust is betrayed, together we will do the hard work of holding one another accountable, repenting, and seeking forgiveness, praying to ‘live lives worthy of our calling.’”

Szachara, who served St. Stephen’s for over a decade, has held several prominent positions in her diocese and The Episcopal Church. She was a deputy at three General Conventions and served on various General Convention committees, in addition to the board of the Diocese of Central New York and several diocesan committees.

– Egan Millard is an assistant editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at emillard@episcopalchurch.org.

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UTO matching grant aims to help build Anglican Pilgrim Centre in Santiago de Compostela

Episcopal News Service - seg, 04/11/2019 - 18:00

In October, 19 Episcopalians took part in United Thank Offering Pilgrims on the Camino, a pilgrimage organized by UTO and the Diocese of Northern Indiana to raise awareness for a proposed Anglican Pilgrim Centre in Santiago de Compostela, Spain. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News Service

[Episcopal News Service – Santiago de Compostela, Spain] Dawn Baity shared stories, tears, laughter, meals and lodging with fellow pilgrims along her 32-day walk from Saint-Jean-Pied-de-Port in France to Santiago de Compostela in Spain, but when she arrived at St. James’ Cathedral in the heart of the medieval city and joined hundreds of fellow pilgrims for Mass, she couldn’t share in the Eucharist.

“You’re there at the cathedral and you’re hearing about all the countries represented by the pilgrims that arrived in Santiago that day and you’re all worshipping together in this absolutely beautiful Mass, and it’s a Mass of welcome. Then they get to Communion, and you are basically disinvited from the table,” said Baity, who finished her solo walk along the Camino de Santiago de Compostela’s popular 500-mile French Way on Nov. 1, 2018, All Saints’ Day.

Nancy Mead, vice president of the board of the Friends of the Anglican Pilgrim Centre in Santiago, left, and Edie Morrill, right, the board’s treasurer, stand outside the three-story building proposed for the center, which is located just inside the old city directly on the route to the Cathedral of St. James. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News Service

A year later, Baity has left her Chicago home and a full-time grant-writing position to become an Episcopal Church volunteer in mission serving the Spanish Reformed Episcopal Church, from its base in Madrid. Part of her job is to assist the Spanish church in its plan to build an Anglican Pilgrim Centre in Santiago de Compostela, a place where all pilgrims can share in the Eucharist and where women clergy can preside at the table.

“An Anglican center that’s ecumenical is an alternative where people can come and worship, continue that spirit of community and be invited to receive Communion; it’s the invitation that’s the important part,” said Baity, who is a member of Chicago’s St. James Cathedral. “The center is not designed to exclude anyone. It is truly a place of welcome for everyone.”

The Camino de Santiago de Compostela, or “the Way of St. James” is one of Christianity’s oldest networks of pilgrimage routes, stretching across Europe and converging at the tomb of St. James the Greater, known as the patron saint of Spain, as well as of pilgrims and laborers.

A dozen years ago, the Spanish Episcopal Church began receiving phone calls from pilgrims across the Anglican Communion and other Protestant churches who were asking for help with everything from lodging to replacing lost passports, said Bishop Carlos López Lozano, who was consecrated bishop of Spain in 1995.

“We discovered that thousands of youth pilgrims are from the Protestant churches and that they really need something,” he said, while seated in a café in Santiago de Compostela not far from the three-story building in mind for the Anglican Pilgrim Centre. “And we started to offer them spiritual support.

“In the Roman Catholic Church they are very clear that they do not give Communion to non-Roman Catholics,” López explained. “At the end of the pilgrims’ Mass at the cathedral in Santiago, in five languages – English, French, German, Spanish and Galician – they say, ‘Remember before you take Communion, you must go through confession and fast for two hours. If you are not Catholic, please do not take Communion because Communion is not for you.’”

Bishop Carlos López Lozano of the Spanish Reformed Episcopal Church, right, and Northern Indiana Bishop Douglas Sparks preside over a Eucharist at the Church of Santa Susana, a Roman Catholic church used by special arrangement with the Archdiocese of Santiago de Compostela. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News Service

Last year, 327,378 pilgrims – the majority on foot and split 50-50 male and female – traveled the length of one route or some section of the Camino de Santiago. Forty-four percent were Spaniards, followed in order by large numbers of Italians, Germans and Americans and including another 173 nationalities, according to official statistics.

The United Thank Offering pilgrims pose for a group photo on the start of the third day.

The massive Cathedral of St. James – also called the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela – normally hosts at least one pilgrims’ Mass daily, though as it undergoes a major restoration, the location and frequency have changed. And, given the archdiocese’s friendly relationship with López, it has offered the cathedral’s Chapel of St. Andrew to the Spanish Episcopal Church to hold its own Mass, López said. Still, so as not to offend, women cannot preside. But beyond that, the church found that pilgrims need at last two days after completing the walk to reflect on their spiritual journey.

“We were thinking there must be an Anglican place in Santiago de Compostela for pilgrims to give them the opportunity to have a safe space where they can stay for one or two days to reflect on their spiritual life at the end of the pilgrimage,” López said.

Four years ago, a group calling itself Friends of the Anglican Pilgrim Centre in Santiago began working alongside López to lay the groundwork for the center. This year, the United Thank Offering has joined the effort. UTO has set aside $60,000 in matching funds for the 2020 grant cycle. To date, $23,594 has been raised. The total cost for the center is estimated at $5 million.

In October, 31 Episcopalians traveled to Spain for a 10-day pilgrimage organized by UTO in coordination with the Episcopal Diocese of Northern Indiana through Corazon Travel.

Just after arrival, the larger group split into two: A dozen people traveled by bus with López to discover how UTO helped the church rebuild after the death of former Spanish dictator Francisco Franco, work that continues today. The second and larger group set off to walk the final 62 miles of the Camino from Sarria-Portomarín to Santiago de Compostela.

Dawn Baity reaching the “minimum required distance” to receive the Camino de Santiago de Compostela certificate. Last year, Baity completed the entire 500-mile distance along the popular French Way. Photo: Michael Donnoe

Like Baity, who last year set out on her own to walk the Camino, Nancy Mead first set out alone to walk the Camino 20 years ago and since then makes an annual pilgrimage.

“One of the things on the Camino is you bring a stone that’s a symbol of a burden or sadness, and you leave it at the face of this cross … this whole idea of weight and shedding weight and leaving the sorrow,” said Mead, who serves as vice president of the Friends of the Anglican Pilgrim Centre in Santiago.

Not everyone can take a month or six weeks away from work and family to make a pilgrimage, and not everyone can do it alone or has the physical ability to walk the Camino in its entirety. For that reason, the UTO pilgrims set out to walk the last length of the journey as a group.

“We just became a community immediately with the older ones caring for the younger ones and the ones who could walk better cared for the ones who couldn’t,” said the Rev. Michelle Walker, UTO’s associate staff officer. “The pro to being in the group is the pleasure of having other people that you know, that you see along the way, that help you that encourage you, that you also get to help and encourage. The camaraderie, to be honest, got me out of bed on mornings when I just might not have because after the first couple days of walking, you feel it.”

At the base of a tall stone cross on the Camino de Santiago near Palas de Rei, many pilgrims have left offerings of stones, flowers, acorns, photos, coins and cards, along with their wishes, dreams and prayers. Photo: Michael Donnoe

Along the way, Northern Indiana Bishop Douglas Sparks shared conversations with people about their lives, struggles and burdens. “It was an opportunity to listen, to walk along the road and say, ‘Gosh, you know, that’s happened in my life,’ or ‘That’s how God called me, or got my attention,’” he said.

Northern Indiana Bishop Doug Sparks successfully navigates the stepping stones to cross a river along the Camino de Santiago. Photo: Michelle Walker

Sparks brought some of his own burdens and concerns, as well as those of the people he serves at home. He said the 62-mile walk was difficult, taking attention and focus, and that he spent a lot of time in thought and silent prayer.

“I decided I was going to pray the rosary every day for the people among whom I serve because the rhythm and pattern of walking is that rhythm and pattern of prayer,” said Sparks. “It was also a time I was thinking, you know, this is the way the Gospel was spread. … Jesus sent the apostles and they walked, and when they got to the ocean, they got on a boat and then they walked to the next place.

“And whether or not you believe in all the traditions and such, the reality is, the way the Gospel was spread throughout the world was through people walking.”

One of Jesus’ 12 disciples, St. James is said to have brought Christianity to the Iberian Peninsula following Jesus’ crucifixion. Later, upon his return to Judea in A.D. 44, he was beheaded by King Herod.

Religious pilgrimages have played a role in all religious traditions – Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, paganism – and in the Christian tradition dating back to the second and third centuries.

The day the Episcopal pilgrims arrived at Santiago, they paid a visit to the cathedral and joined the long line of visitors and pilgrims to touch St. James’ tomb, but it wasn’t until the following day that they worshipped together at the Church of Santa Susana, a Roman Catholic church in Alameda Park, and shared the Eucharist, again by special arrangement with the archdiocese.

UTO board member Caitlyn Darnell took a photo of her hiking boots as the first “official steps” of her journey along the Camino de Santiago de Compostela. The scallop shell is a symbol of direction along the Camino and is also worn as a sign of camaraderie. Photo: Caitlyn Darnell

For Caitlyn Darnell, a UTO board member and a candidate for ordination in the Diocese of North Carolina, coming together at the table was an important part of the journey, akin to “laying one’s heart on the altar in joy.”

“Walking the Camino was so emotional in ways I don’t think I fully appreciated. … I can’t imagine having arrived here and not having the opportunity to take the Eucharist because walking a pilgrimage is a metaphor for what we’re doing on this earthly journey. We’re walking together, we’re struggling, but we’re holding each other in joy and in community as we’re pushing toward that heavenly city on the other side of this life,” said Darnell. “To not have the opportunity to give thanks for what Christ did so that we would have the opportunity to be with him on the other side … it seems absurd.”

– Lynette Wilson is a reporter and managing editor of Episcopal News Service. She can be reached at lwilson@episcopalchurch.org.

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Jonathan H. Folts ordained, consecrated 11th bishop of South Dakota

Episcopal News Service - seg, 04/11/2019 - 13:58

South Dakota Bishop Jonathan Folts participates in his consecration Nov. 2 at T.F. Riggs High School Theater in Pierre. Photo: Kimberly Folts

[Episcopal Diocese of South Dakota] In a historic service Nov. 2 in Pierre, the Rt. Rev. Jonathan H. Folts was consecrated as the 11th bishop of South Dakota.

Folts, elected in May, was the first bishop of South Dakota to be consecrated in Pierre.

In a rare occurrence in The Episcopal Church, Folts’ father, the Rt. Rev. James E. Folts, retired bishop of West Texas, served as both a co-consecrator and the preacher.

Retired Bishop Folts, who ordained the new bishop as both a deacon and a priest in West Texas, reminded his son that the most important ordination, “the one that changed your life the most, was that first one, the one that made you a deacon. For in that one … you declared your desire, your intention and indeed your willingness, for the rest of your life, to be a servant.”

Ordination to priesthood and the episcopacy “are but subsets of that first ordination,” he said, adding, “I have every reason to believe that you know this great truth, and that you believe this deep in the very core of your being.”

He continued by describing a bishop’s job as being one of casting a vision for the diocese while remembering to never work alone; finding the resources, both human and financial, to accomplish the vision; and holding the people accountable, or, as he said, “maintaining order.”

But, he stressed, the new bishop should “take care never to equate yourself with the office” of bishop, and he reminded his son of the days when they played chess together. “Remember always,” he said, “that when each game of chess is over, the bishops and the pawns all go back into the same box.”

The most poignant moment of the sermon came when the retired bishop delivered the new bishop’s charge: “Jonathan, my son and soon to be my brother (bishop),” he said, his voice cracking with emotion, “would you now please stand.”

He ended his sermon by telling his son: “I love you. God bless you.”

In his first remarks to the diocese, the newly consecrated bishop told the people, “Today is the beginning of a new chapter in diocesan history. … It is not a new story. … The story is still God’s story. Jesus is still the central character of that story. And the Holy Spirit is the editor who walks with us day after day as we live into that story. This is a new chapter, not a new story.”

Nov. 2 also was the 23rd wedding anniversary for Folts and his wife, the Rev. Kimberly Folts. The new bishop thanked everyone for coming out to help them celebrate, and he added, “Apparently what you get for a 23rd anniversary is a big hat and stick!”

The two-hour service, held at T.F. Riggs High School Theater and attended by more than 300 people and live-streamed to the diocese, began with Lakota and English hymns and included the reading of the Gospel in Lakota, Dinka and English. The responses to Gospel acclamation, the Doxology, and several communion hymns were also sung in Lakota. A special offertory anthem, composed by Stephen Yarbrough of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Vermillion, South Dakota, was sung by the consecration choir, with members drawn from across the diocese.

Several bishops joined Presiding Bishop Michael Curry for the consecration of South Dakota Bishop Jonathan Folts on Nov. 2. Photo: Diocese of South Dakota

Presiding Bishop Michael B. Curry was the chief consecrator at the service, and he and Folts’ father were joined by the Rt. Rev. John T. Tarrant, retired bishop of South Dakota, Folts’ predecessor; Connecticut Bishop Ian T. Douglas; West Texas Bishop David M. Reed; and the Rt. Rev. Carlos S. Matsinhe, bishop of the Anglican Diocese of Lebombo, Mozambique.

Curry, in remarks at the offertory, said, “This is a great getting-up morning. South Dakota, we thank God for you, we are proud of you, and we thank God that we are your sisters and brothers and siblings in Jesus Christ. Congratulations! Congratulations! Congratulations!”

The offering for the service will be divided between scholarships for Thunderhead Episcopal Center, the diocesan camp and conference center, and the new bishop’s discretionary fund.

Tarrant presented his successor with the diocesan crozier with the words: “Jonathan, on behalf of the people and clergy of the Diocese of South Dakota, I give into your hands this pastoral staff. May Christ the good shepherd uphold you and sustain you as you carry it in his name.”

Five other bishops participated in the service: the Rt. Rev. Craig B. Anderson, the eighth bishop of South Dakota; Wyoming Bishop John S. Smylie; Nebraska Bishop J. Scott Barker; Iowa Bishop Alan Scarfe; and the Rt. Rev. Joe Burnett, retired bishop of Nebraska.

The Diocese of South Dakota is comprised of 75 congregations in South Dakota, two in Nebraska, and one in Minnesota. Its cathedral, Calvary Cathedral, is located in Sioux Falls. The Diocese of South Dakota has a unique multicultural membership and history; approximately 60 percent of the 12,000 baptized Episcopalians are either Dakota, Lakota or Nakota Sioux. The diocese also has one congregation composed of Sudanese immigrants in Sioux Falls.

– The Rev. Lauren R. Stanley is superintending presbyter of the Rosebud Episcopal Mission-West in South Dakota.

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Los Angeles’ Bloy House will move to Lutheran Center in Glendale

Episcopal News Service - seg, 04/11/2019 - 09:37

Bishop John Harvey Taylor of the Episcopal Diocese of Los Angeles, far left, catches a selfie with some of those gathered to sign the lease agreement for Bloy House’s new offices at the Lutheran Center in Glendale, administrative center of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, Southwest California Synod. Photo: John Taylor/Diocese of Los a

[Diocese of Los Angeles] Bishop John Harvey Taylor, Dean Sylvia Sweeney and members of the Bloy House board of trustees joined Bishop Guy Erwin of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America’s Southwest California Synod to sign a lease agreement for the Episcopal seminary — formally known as Episcopal School of Theology at Claremont, or ETSC — to move into offices at ELCA’s Lutheran Center in Glendale.

The two bishops began discussing the collaboration last spring. Canon to the Ordinary Melissa McCarthy, Sweeney, and Bloy House vice chair Steve Nishibayashi soon joined in the planning process.

“From the very beginning, from the warm hospitality evinced by Bishop Erwin and all his colleagues, we knew the Holy Spirit was guiding us,” Taylor said. “Next year marks the 20th anniversary of the Episcopal-Lutheran concordat. I can think of no better way to celebrate than to join hands in helping form the lay and ordained leaders whom both our denominations will need if we are to embrace our pluralistic destiny in the 21st century.”

The concordat, “Called to Common Mission,” adopted in 1999, established The Episcopal Church and ELCA as full-communion partners.

“[Bloy House] will be welcome partners in theological education,” Erwin wrote on Facebook, “and I hope their presence will be a stimulus for the development of a multicultural, inter-denominational theological education center in our synod that benefits our church and our partner churches.”

The move will take place next summer, according to Sweeney.

“This agreement marks the beginning of what Bishop John, the board of trustees, and I believe will be an exciting and enriching next chapter for Bloy House,” Sweeney said. “We pray that many Episcopalians and Lutherans will find a spiritual home on our new shared campus. In an age when relationships and partnerships stand at the heart of our hope for the future of our world, this is a partnership of passionate Christians committed to lifelong formation for Christian people. I know this partnership will bear much fruit for years to come.”

“Having been involved in the gestation of this project, today felt to this retired pediatrician like the birthing of a baby whose potential is unknown and limitless and remains to be nourished and enjoyed,” said Nishibayashi, chair of the Bloy House board, who also attended the signing, which took place during a brief service of worship and welcome.

“Bloy House plans to be in our new offices on July 1, 2020, following a couple of transitional weeks of moving,” Sweeney said. “We hope that many in the diocese will lend a hand in helping make that move as smooth and swift as possible.”

The transition to a new location became necessary when the Methodist-affiliated Claremont School of Theology, where Bloy House has been resident for nearly 50 years, announced that it will move to the campus of Willamette University in Salem, Oregon.

“Our 60-year ecumenical academic partnership with the United Methodists through Claremont School of Theology’s low-residency hybrid master of divinity program will also continue as their move to Salem, Oregon, moves forward,” said Sweeney.

Many clergy of the Diocese of Los Angeles, including Taylor and Bishop Suffragan Diane Jardine Bruce, are graduates of Bloy House. Other alumni serve in dioceses throughout The Episcopal Church.

Bloy House classes, which occur on alternating weekends between September and May, will continue at the Claremont campus until May 2020. The seminary’s final graduation at CST is scheduled for Saturday, May 16, 11 a.m. at Kresge Chapel. Taylor will be celebrant and preacher at the graduation Eucharist.

“[F]or many of us, Kresge Chapel and the classrooms of CST have been the setting for life transforming moments, deep challenges, and fulfilled dreams,” Sweeney wrote as she announced the graduation date in Bloy House’s monthly newsletter. “We hope that many of you who share our love for that place will be able to be present for this final graduation on the site.”

Bloy House, named for Francis Eric Bloy, third bishop of the Diocese of Los Angeles, was founded in the late 1950s as a weekend program for people who wanted to study theology but who were working full time and could not attend a residential seminary. It has been resident at CTS since 1970. Its classes are held on Friday evenings and Saturdays. Students may opt to study for a master of divinity degree that is completed through CST, or an Anglican Studies program. Bloy House also hosts the Fresh Start program for lay leaders, Instituto de Liderazgo that trains Spanish-speaking church leaders, and Education for Episcopal Leadership.

— Janet Kawamoto is editor of the Diocese of Los Angeles’ Episcopal News. Samantha Henderson, communications officer for the Southwest California Synod, contributed to this story.

The post Los Angeles’ Bloy House will move to Lutheran Center in Glendale appeared first on Episcopal News Service.

IEAB se faz representar na Missão Ecumênica ao Oeste Baiano

SNIEAB Feeds - ter, 08/10/2019 - 14:52
O Bispo Francisco de Assis da Silva, da Diocese Sul Ocidental, a convite do bispo Primaz e da CESE, representou a IEAB, durante os dias 3 a 5, na caravana ecumênica ao Oeste da Bahia para acompanhar de perto a grave situação a que estão submetidas as populações tradicionais geraizeiras que estão em luta por dignidade e direitos em direto conflito com o agronegócio e com empreendimentos hidroelétricos. O programa da Missão Ecumênica, como é chamada a caravana, incluiu uma audiência pública realizada na Câmara Municipal de Barreiras, com a presença de diversas autoridades e representantes de Igrejas, Organismos Ecumênicos e movimentos sociais. Nesta audiência, os relatos expuseram de forma inequívoca a situação de grave violação dos direitos das populações tradicionais e violações ambientais gravíssimas. No dia seguinte, a Missão foi dividida em grupos para visitar localmente as comunidades nas cidades de  Correntina, Serra Dourada e São Desidério e foi possível constatar os danos ambientais, emocionais e se ouviu relatos que só demonstram a perversidade com que o capital trata as pessoas que lutam em manter um modo de produção que respeita o meio ambiente e se caracteriza pelo modo solidário de produção e uso dos recursos naturais. Após estas visitas, a Missão realizou uma grande celebração na cidade de Correntina, de caráter inter-religioso, onde se fez a memória do/as mártires da defesa do Cerrado e se proclamou uma carta de solidariedade que será traduzida e partilhada com toda a comunidade inter-religiosa nacional e internacional, para ampliar a rede de solidariedade aos irmãos e irmãs que vivem uma constante ameaça à sua integridade e à integridade de seu território. A Missão foi coordenada pelo Fórum Ecumênico ACT Brasil (FEACT) que realizou esta Missão Ecumênica sob o lema “Pelas Águas dos Cerrados da Bahia”.

Envie uma proposta de Tema ou Lema para a CFE 2021

SNIEAB Feeds - qua, 02/10/2019 - 09:19
Em 2021, o Conselho Nacional de Igrejas Cristãs do Brasil (CONIC) promoverá mais uma edição da Campanha da Fraternidade Ecumênica (CFE). A ação reunirá todas as igrejas-membro do CONIC (veja quais são), membros fraternos, regionais e demais coletivos. Uma das características da CFE é seu caráter participativo e plural. Todas os grupos, pastorais, comunidades e pessoas de diferentes expressões de fé identificadas com o testemunho cristão em favor da justiça, da misericórdia e do diálogo são convidadas a se integrar na CFE. Por isso, gostaríamos muito de conhecer a sua opinião sobre Tema e Lema da nova CFE. Já temos algumas dicas, por exemplo, a reflexão sobre Educação para a paz em um Mundo Multirreligioso – documento do Conselho Mundial de Igrejas (CMI). No entanto, podem ser outras possibilidades… Daí a importância de sabermos a opinião e o desejo de cada um e cada uma de vocês. Como sugerir Tema ou Lema? É muito simples: Basta encaminhar a sugestão para comunicacao@conic.org.br com nome e sobrenome (ou indicando a igreja, organismo ecumênico, grupos de base, movimento…). Depois disso é só aguardar a confirmação de envio (confirmaremos todos). Obs.: Lema é sempre um versículo bíblico de apoio ao Tema. Prazo: 19 de outubro.

Reverenda Elineide participa do II Encontro Nacional da Rede de Diaconia

SNIEAB Feeds - ter, 17/09/2019 - 15:57
Nos dias 16 a 18 de setembro de 2019, aconteceu o ll Encontro Nacional da Rede de Diaconia, foi convidada da Fundação Luterana de Diaconia, a Reverenda Elineide Ferreira Oliveira que participou do encontro a partir do contato e amizade com o facilitador da “Nem tão doce lar” Rogério Aguiar, que aplicou a metodologia da Oficina por dois anos consecutivos em Ariquemes para formação, sensibilização da rede local de enfrentamento a violência contra a mulher, do qual a Casa Noeli  que é um serviço Diaconal da IEAB está inserida, este convite foi para partilhar da experiência em  ação concreta do serviço diaconal da Igreja no enfrentamento a violência doméstica. O painel que a reverenda participou, com João Klug, historiador e professor na UFSC, em Florianópolis com o tema “Desafios da diaconia frente ao contexto brasileiro”,  abordou pontos cruciais da importância do fortalecimento diaconal ante ao cenário da permissividade de tudo que viola direitos, o tema abordado pela clériga foi “Superação da violência doméstica e familiar” com o relato da experiência da Casa Noeli. Texto: Elineide F. Oliveira Edição: Nilo Junior

Pastoral Letter from the House of Bishops

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Creation itself will be set free from its bondage to decay and will obtain the freedom of the glory of the children of God. We know that the whole creation has been groaning in labor pains until now. (Romans 8.21-22) We are facing the worst wave of fires in Brazil in seven years. For more than two weeks the Amazon Forest has been on fire, burnt by greed and hatred. In 2019 only the Amazon suffers from 52.5% of fire outbreaks in Brazil. It is worth noticing that a rise in fires happened soon after the president of the republic criticized INPE (National Institute for Space Research) and dismissed its coordinator when the institute warned that an increase (more than 80%) in forest fires in Brazil between January and August this year, if compared to the same period last year. Those fires in the Amazon are not the result of drought, nor the result of natural hazards. Those are actions orchestrated by people representing agribusiness, land grabbers and prospectors encouraged by the president’s irresponsible speeches and statements. He argued that Ibama (the National Institute for the Environment) was a tax industry, and said his government would not regulate any more natural or indigenous reserves. He also constantly mentions that intends to allow mining and digging in such reserves. He claims environmental discourse is “vegan stuff” and that it delays the country’s progress. The burning in the Amazon is also the result of a government policy that seeks to scrap and dismantle Socio-Environmental policies and Environmental protection agencies. This year, the Ministry of Environment suffered a R$ 187 million cut and Ibama suffered a R$ 89 million cut. As a result of this scenario, we have watched flames consume part of the forest that contains the greatest biological and cultural diversity of the planet. Flames have reached the triple border between Brazil, Bolivia and Paraguay, consuming thousands of hectares of vegetation, carbonizing fauna and flora, and violating rights of indigenous peoples, caboclos and quilombola communities. The president has been silent. His ironic attitude towards what is happening in the Amazon, as a means of minimizing consequences of forest fires, coupled with the attempt to hold environmental protection NGOs responsible constitute a systematic strategy of a death government resulting in a huge catastrophe and the unprecedented devastation of part of the Amazon biome. As Anglican Christians, we cannot be silent. We must reclaim the Anglican Marks of Mission we affirm though our Baptismal Covenant and commit to strive to safeguard the integrity of creation, transform the unjust structures of society and challenge violence of every kind, respecting the dignity of every human being and seeking peace and reconciliation. The House of Bishops of the Church Episcopal Anglican of Brazil repudiates our current government’s actions. We urge our people to pray for the Amazon, to bear witness to their faith and denounce all disrespectful actions towards the environment and society. We must affirm life by promoting human dignity, justice, peace, social and environmental preservation as signs and fruits of Christ’s commandment to love God and one another. “Breath of life, who bore in your womb all created order, teach us to respect all creatures, as witnesses to the Gospel, which encourages us to fight for the preservation of nature, restoring the dream of Eden and perfecting what you have given us as a gift. In the name of Jesus Christ, we present our prayers. Amen.” (Collect for Environmental Responsibility – 2015 Brazilian Book of Common Prayer, page 520) House of Bishops Bishop Naudal Alves Gomes, Anglican Diocese of Paraná e Primaz Bishop Maurício Andrade, Anglican Diocese of Brasília IGREJA EPISCOPAL ANGLICANA DO BRASIL Pastoral Letter from the House of Bishops Bishop Renato Raazt, Anglican Diocese of Pelotas Bishop Francisco de Assis da Silva , Southwestern Brazil Diocese Bishop Humberto Maiztegui , Southern Brazil Diocese Bishop João Câncio Peixoto, Anglican Diocese of Recife Bishop Eduardo Coelho Grillo, Anglican Diocese of Rio de Janeiro Bishop Marinez Rosa dos Santos Bassotto, Anglican Diocese of the Amazon Bishop Clóvis Erly Rodrigues, Emeritus Bishop Almir dos Santos, Emeritus Bishop Celso Franco, Emeritus Bishop Jubal Pereira Neves, Emeritus Bishop Orlando Oliveira, Emeritus Bishop Filadelfo de Oliveira, Emeritus Bishop Saulo de Barros, Emeritus

Mensagem Pastoral da Câmara Episcopal

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A criação abriga a esperança, pois ela também será liberta da escravidão da corrupção para participar da liberdade e da glória dos filhos e filhas de Deus. Pois sabemos que toda a criação geme e sofre como que dores de parto até o presente dia. ( Romanos 8.21-22) Estamos enfrentando a pior onda de incêndios no Brasil em sete anos. Há mais de duas semanas nossa Amazônia arde em chamas, inflamada pela ganância e pelo ódio. Em 2019 a Amazônia concentra 52,5% dos focos de queimadas do Brasil, chama a atenção que essas queimadas tenham aumentado logo após o presidente da república criticar o INPE (Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais) e demitir seu coordenador porque o instituto alertou para o aumento superior a 80% no número de incêndios florestais no Brasil, entre janeiro e agosto deste ano, em comparação com o mesmo período do ano passado. Os incêndios na Amazônia não são fruto do período de estiagem na região, não são resultado da ação da própria natureza, tratam-se de ações orquestradas por pessoas representantes do agronegócio, por grileiros e garimpeiros incentivados pelo discurso irresponsável do presidente da república e suas afirmações inconsequentes de que o Ibama é uma indústria de multas, que em seu governo não mais serão demarcadas áreas de proteção ambiental ou reservas indígenas, que deseja abrir áreas protegidas para a exploração, mineração e garimpo, que discurso ambiental é “coisa de vegano” e que atrasa o país. As queimadas na Amazônia são também resultado de uma política de governo que busca o sucateamento e desmonte das Políticas Socioambientais e das instâncias de proteção ambiental com um corte de 187 milhões de reais para o ministério do Meio Ambiente e de 89 milhões para o Ibama; Como resultado desta conjuntura assistimos estarrecidos as labaredas consumirem parte da floresta que contém a maior diversidade biológica e cultural do planeta, as chamas atingiram a tríplice fronteira entre Brasil, Bolívia e Paraguai, consumindo milhares de hectares de vegetação, carbonizando nossa fauna e flora, somando-se a isso a violação de direitos e morte das populações indígenas, e o sofrimento das comunidades ribeirinhas e quilombolas. O silêncio da presidência da república, as ironias sobre a situação da Amazônia, a intenção de minimizar as consequências das queimadas criminosas e a tentativa de responsabilizar as ONGs de proteção ambiental configuram uma estratégia sistemática de um governo de morte resultando em uma enorme catástrofe e na devastação sem precedentes de parte do bioma Amazônia. Como pessoas cristãs anglicanas não podemos nos calar e queremos reafirmar as Marcas Anglicanas da Missão proferidas no momento de nossa Aliança Batismal e com elas reassumir o compromisso de lutar para salvaguardar a integridade da criação e de transformar as estruturas injustas da sociedade, desafiando toda sorte de violência, respeitando a dignidade de toda pessoa humana e buscando a paz e a reconciliação. E como Câmara Episcopal da Igreja Episcopal Anglicana do Brasil repudiamos as ações do atual governo, e conclamamos nosso povo a orar pela Amazônia, a testemunhar por palavras e obras a fé que professam, a denunciar todas as atitudes de desrespeito socioambiental e a viver o compromisso com a Cultura da Vida no resgate da dignidade, da justiça, da paz e da preservação socioambiental como sinais e frutos da vivência do amor segundo o mandamento de Cristo. “Sopro de vida, que gestaste em teu ventre toda a ordem criada, ensina-nos a respeitar todas as criaturas, em testemunho vivo do Evangelho, que nos instiga a lutar pela preservação da natureza, restaurando o ideal do Éden e a perfeição daquilo que nos deste como presente. Em nome de Jesus Cristo, entregamos nossas orações. Amém”  (Coleta Pela Responsabilidade Ambiental – Livro de Oração Comum, pág. 520) Câmara Episcopal Bispo Naudal Alves Gomes, Diocese Anglicana do Paraná e Primaz Bispo Maurício Andrade, Diocese Anglicana de Brasília Bispo Renato Raazt, Diocese Anglicana de Pelotas Bispo Francisco de Assis da Silva , Diocese Sul- Ocidental Bispo Humberto Maiztegui , Diocese Meridional Bispo João Câncio Peixoto, Diocese Anglicana de Recife Bispo Eduardo Coelho Grillo, Diocese Anglicana do Rio de Janeiro Bispa Marinez Rosa dos Santos Bassotto, Diocese Anglicana da Amazônia Bispo Clóvis Erly Rodrigues, Emérito Bispo Almir dos Santos, Emérito Bispo Celso Franco, Emérito Bispo Jubal Pereira Neves, Emérito Bispo Orlando Oliveira, Emérito Bispo Filadelfo de Oliveira, Emérito Bispo Saulo de Barros, Emérito

Anglicanos e anglicanas participam da Marcha das Margaridas

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foto: Divulgação / Bispo Maurício, Diocese Anglicana de Brasília participa da Marcha

A Marcha das Margaridas caminha para sua 6ª. marcha, nesta quarta feira 14 de agosto, através de mais uma ação coletiva, da qual participaram mulheres, crianças e homens, que propõe a construção de um Brasil sem violências, e onde sejam respeitadas a democracia e a soberania popular. Membros e membras de nossa Igreja participaram da Marcha em Brasília este ano.

Por meio de um processo colaborativo de construção nos âmbitos municipais, estaduais e nacional, a organização da Marcha das Margaridas 2019 envolveu a participação de trabalhadoras do campo, da floresta, das águas, e contou com o apoio de trabalhadoras urbanas, ativistas e lideranças de movimentos sociais.

A Plataforma Política da 6ª. Marcha das Margaridas, organizadas em 10 eixos, trouxe reflexões importantes, imprescindíveis e urgentes de serem abordadas e enfrentadas. Questões que refletem a conjuntura e a estrutura dos problemas sociais, econômicos e políticos da nossa sociedade brasileira.

A Marcha das Margaridas 2019 vem denunciar o aumento da violência a partir do aumento das desigualdades sociais que estamos vivenciando, pautadas nas relações de classe, gênero e raça, bem como o desmonte e as violações dos nossos direitos sociais, que viemos conquistando com muita luta e suor desde o final da década de 1980 e início de 1990, com a instituição do Estado Democrático de Direitos.

A 6ª. Marcha das Margaridas denuncia ainda o corte no orçamento de incentivo à produção de alimentos, e de Políticas Públicas como as de Assistência Social, Saúde, Educação e Moradia.

Texto partilhado por: Jacinta Chaves. Diocese Anglicana de Brasília

Fotos: Divulgação/Redes sociais

Dia Internacional dos Povos Indígenas

SNIEAB Feeds - dom, 11/08/2019 - 21:12
Dizer que “um dia” dedicado aos Povos Indígenas é uma forma de mitigar ou minimizar nossas consciências ocidentais europeias com respeito à dívida histórica e irreparável do sangue derramado desses povos é, no mínimo, uma brincadeira de mau gosto. Já não basta o fatídico “dia do índio”, no qual pintam a cara das crianças, põem penas em seus cabelos (compradas num mercado que explora animais) e desfilam como dentro de um espírito bizarro.  De brincadeiras assim, (ainda que inocentes) nossos irmãos donos da terra já estão cheios. Estão cheios de serem tratados como museus, lembranças do passado ou mesmo como fósseis de uma sociedade que deveria ser extinta. Dedicar um dia aos Povos Indígenas é atestar nosso fracasso com respeito ao que é mais sagrado: o respeito às nossas origens. Se até hoje o brasileiro tem dificuldades de se ver como brasileiro, é porque nossas origens são negadas, como se fôssemos filhos diletos da marinha europeia. Se é preciso lembrar, é porque sempre foi esquecido, nunca foi ninguém. Ser ninguém é a única coisa que nossos antepassados estão cheios. É preciso ir além disso. É preciso ir além de uma data vermelha no calendário. É preciso identificação com esses irmãos e irmãs que historicamente foram considerados peças de museu ou simplesmente folclore brasileiro. É preciso ter um sentimento de brasileiridade, mais do que idolatrar a bandeira nacional.  É preciso ser nacionalista, não ao “brasil trumpista”, mas ao Brasil-Brasil. É preciso saber reconhecer os verdadeiros latifundiários, ou seja, os verdadeiros donos dessas terras tupiniquins. Nos verdadeiros latifundiários, não existia fome, não existia falta de terra, nem sem terra. Na época em que Iñandejara governava os céus e a terra, não havia carestia, não havia miséria, não havia armas de fogo, não havia índios. Menos ainda, existia um “Deus acima de todos”, pois Iñandejara estava “junto” de todos. Haviam, de fato, brasileiros…. Aproveito esse grito para solidarizar com os povos Kaiowá, Guarani, Kinikinau e Terenas, que são nações originais do Mato Grosso do Sul. Agradeço a eles por terem cuidado tão bem dessa terra que hoje, com tanta facilidade destruo dia pós dia. Agradeço por terem conservado as águas, as matas e os animais que são atropelados no Lago do Amor. Esses são meus avós, tataravós que, dia pós dia, estão sendo esquecidos pelo cano da bala, pela difamação, pela desapropriação egoísta, pelo crescimento da economia. Pois eles atrasam a economia do país, eles são culpados pela miséria dessa nação, são violentos, preguiçosos, e fazem arruaça. Nós, da Paróquia da Inclusão – IEAB, aproveitamos esse dia para dizer Não as barbaridades que esses povos tem sofrido em nosso Estado. É inaceitável o modo como os verdadeiros latifundiários desse país são tratados: a base de bíblia e de bala. Queremos conclamar as autoridades públicas que sejam mais firmes contra as violências praticadas a esses povos. E dizer que é uma vergonha ser cristão, se sob esse título não estiver uma profunda identificação com nossos avós, tios, tataravós, etc. Em tempos como os nossos, não precisamos de bíblias, precisamos que Iñanderu volte e reine novamente sobre a terra!

Dizer que “um dia” dedicado aos Povos Indígenas é uma forma de mitigar ou minimizar nossas consciências ocidentais europeias com respeito à dívida histórica e irreparável do sangue derramado desses povos é, no mínimo, uma brincadeira de mau gosto. Já não basta o fatídico “dia do índio”, no qual pintam a cara das crianças, põem penas em seus cabelos (compradas num mercado que explora animais) e desfilam como dentro de um espírito bizarro.  De brincadeiras assim, (ainda que inocentes) nossos irmãos donos da terra já estão cheios. Estão cheios de serem tratados como museus, lembranças do passado ou mesmo como fósseis de uma sociedade que deveria ser extinta.Dedicar um dia aos Povos Indígenas é atestar nosso fracasso com respeito ao que é mais sagrado: o respeito às nossas origens. Se até hoje o brasileiro tem dificuldades de se ver como brasileiro, é porque nossas origens são negadas, como se fôssemos filhos diletos da marinha europeia. Se é preciso lembrar, é porque sempre foi esquecido, nunca foi ninguém. Ser ninguém é a única coisa que nossos antepassados estão cheios.É preciso ir além disso. É preciso ir além de uma data vermelha no calendário. É preciso identificação com esses irmãos e irmãs que historicamente foram considerados peças de museu ou simplesmente folclore brasileiro. É preciso ter um sentimento de brasileiridade, mais do que idolatrar a bandeira nacional.  É preciso ser nacionalista, não ao “brasil trumpista”, mas ao Brasil-Brasil.

É preciso saber reconhecer os verdadeiros latifundiários, ou seja, os verdadeiros donos dessas terras tupiniquins. Nos verdadeiros latifundiários, não existia fome, não existia falta de terra, nem sem terra. Na época em que Iñandejara governava os céus e a terra, não havia carestia, não havia miséria, não havia armas de fogo, não havia índios. Menos ainda, existia um “Deus acima de todos”, pois Iñandejara estava “junto” de todos. Haviam, de fato, brasileiros….

Aproveito esse grito para solidarizar com os povos Kaiowá, Guarani, Kinikinau e Terenas, que são nações originais do Mato Grosso do Sul. Agradeço a eles por terem cuidado tão bem dessa terra que hoje, com tanta facilidade destruo dia pós dia. Agradeço por terem conservado as águas, as matas e os animais que são atropelados no Lago do Amor. Esses são meus avós, tataravós que, dia pós dia, estão sendo esquecidos pelo cano da bala, pela difamação, pela desapropriação egoísta, pelo crescimento da economia. Pois eles atrasam a economia do país, eles são culpados pela miséria dessa nação, são violentos, preguiçosos, e fazem arruaça.

Nós, da Paróquia da Inclusão – IEAB, aproveitamos esse dia para dizer Não as barbaridades que esses povos tem sofrido em nosso Estado. É inaceitável o modo como os verdadeiros latifundiários desse país são tratados: a base de bíblia e de bala. Queremos conclamar as autoridades públicas que sejam mais firmes contra as violências praticadas a esses povos. E dizer que é uma vergonha ser cristão, se sob esse título não estiver uma profunda identificação com nossos avós, tios, tataravós, etc. Em tempos como os nossos, não precisamos de bíblias, precisamos que Iñanderu volte e reine novamente sobre a terra!

Via: Paróquia da Inclusão-IEAB

Jovens brasileiras participam do encontro de Jovens Episcopais no Panamá

SNIEAB Feeds - seg, 29/07/2019 - 10:20
Entre os dias 17 a 19 de julho, aconteceu na cidade do Panamá o Encontro de Jóvenes Episcopales (Encontro de Jovens Episcopais) organizado pela IX Província em conjunto com a IARCA (Iglesia Anglicana de la Region Central de America). Participaram do evento jovens do Panamá, Honduras, República Dominicana, Colômbia, Cuba, Porto Rico, México, Estados Unidos, Equador e Brasil. A celebração de abertura contou com a pregação do Bispo Presidente da Igreja Episcopal dos Estados Unidos, Revmo. Michael Curry. Em seu sermão: “Não tenha vergonha de ser jovem. Siga Jesus e ame”, em sintonia com o lema do Evento “El camino del amor” (O caminho do amor), o Bispo salientou que, em momentos de conflitos, devemos sempre seguir o caminho do amor em nossas vidas, logo, seguir a Jesus, porque Deus é amor. Durante o encontro, os jovens tiveram à sua disposição quatro oficinas com os seguintes temas: Cuidado com a Criação, Liderança, Evangelismo e Reconciliação Racial, podendo participar de três delas. A delegação brasileira foi representada pelas jovens Diana Linhares (Diocese Anglicana do Recife), Paula Mello (Diocese Meridional) e Yarana Borges (Diocese Anglicana de Pelotas), membros do Grupo de Trabalho das Juventudes. Ao decorrer do EJE, os jovens tiveram tempo de reflexão e aprendizagem acerca dos ensinamentos do Evangelho de Jesus bem como partilharam sua cultura e experiência de fé em um espaço acolhedor.

DASP elege bispo Coadjutor

SNIEAB Feeds - ter, 09/07/2019 - 16:43

Foto: Divulgação

Na manhã desta terça feira (09) foi eleito em concílio extraordinário para bispo coadjutor da Diocese Anglicana de São Paulo (DASP) o Reverendo Cézar Fernandes Alves. O Reverendo Cézar está atualmente reitor da Paróquia São João, em São Paulo desde de 2002. Nasceu em Quixeramobim no Ceará e foi ordenado diácono em julho de 1995 e presbítero em junho de 1996, exerceu seu ministério em várias paróquias da IEAB.

O clérigo possui especialização em anglicanismo pelo Centro Anglicano de Birminghan na Inglaterra, MBA e  pós graduação em  Mindfulness. A eleição deverá passar pela homologação da Câmara Episcopal e dos Conselhos Diocesanos para então ser agendada a Cerimônia de Sagração. Parabéns ao Reverendo Cézar que Deus abençoe seu ministério.

Secretaria Geral da IEAB

Texto: Nilo Junior

DASP elege novo bispo coadjuntor

SNIEAB Feeds - ter, 09/07/2019 - 16:26

Foto: Divulgação redes sociais

Na manhã desta terça feira (09) foi eleito em concílio extraordinário para bispo coadjutor da Diocese Anglicana de São Paulo (DASP) o Reverendo Cézar Fernandes Alves. O Reverendo Cézar está atualmente reitor da Paróquia São João, em São Paulo desde de 2002. Nasceu em Quixeramobim no Ceará e foi ordenado diácono em julho de 1995 e presbítero em junho de 1996, exerceu seu ministério em várias paróquias da IEAB.

O clérigo possui MBA e é pós graduado em Gestão Emocional nas Organizações e Mindfulness. A eleição deverá passar pela homologação da Câmara Episcopal e dos Conselhos Diocesanos para então ser agendada a Cerimônia de Sagração.

Parabéns ao Reverendo Cézar que Deus abençoe seu ministério.

Secretaria Geral da IEAB

Texto: Nilo Junior

LGBTI+, Congresso

SNIEAB Feeds - qua, 26/06/2019 - 14:51

LGBTI+, Congresso

Paróquia da Trindade promove Congresso LGBTI+ em São Paulo

SNIEAB Feeds - qua, 26/06/2019 - 14:04
Entre os dias 19 e 23 de junho a Paróquia da Santíssima Trindade da Igreja Episcopal Anglicana do Brasil em São Paulo promoveu e acolheu o 1° Congresso Igrejas e Comunidades LGBTI+ em parceria com Koinonia Presença Ecumênica. O Congresso reuniu diversas lideranças políticas, movimentos sociais e de defesa dos direitos humanos, pessoas que pesquisam ou são interessadas na relação entre espiritualidade e questões LGBTI+ , e religiosas de diferentes comunidades de fé que puderam compartilhar suas experiências com outras comunidades e grupos. Tratando de temas como saúde, política e inclusão. No atual contexto as comunidades têm diferentes posições nas questões envolvendo suas espiritualidades e a diversidade sexual de gênero. Ora apoiando e acolhendo, ora excluindo ou invisibilizando seus fiéis e suas lideranças, tornando, ou não, seus espaços religiosos seguros. Os desafios do acolhimento as pessoas da comunidade LGTBI+ em igrejas e espaços religiosos tem sido uma real necessidade, para essas pessoas que também tem o direito de viver sua fé e serem respeitadas, mas, nem sempre se sentem seguras, temendo serem excluídas ou até mesmo sendo alvo de violências de todo tipo. De acordo com o Reverendo Arthur Cavalcante, reitor da Paróquia da Santíssima Trindade, a ideia de um Congresso surgiu no final do ano passado, pela conjuntura que estávamos atravessando no país, na esfera social, econômica, religiosa e política. “A pergunta era o que podia ser feito para trazer esperança na caminhada de nossas pessoas fiéis? O Congresso surge como uma proposta de usarmos a nossa experiência de Paróquia a serviço das pessoas, irmãs de fé e de luz aos movimentos sociais. Acredito que o Congresso alcançou plenamente seus objetivos.” Segundo o reverendo foi uma proposta que não só usou as ferramentas/expertises teológicas da IEAB, como também o exercício do ethos anglicano, somado ao jeito da comunidade local de tratar assuntos tão delicados de forma prática e pastoral na última década. A experiencia da Paróquia da Trindade em lidar com determinados temas gerou uma confiança de entidades parceiras e gentes que militam em diferentes espaços. “A IEAB, através da JUNET, foi uma grande parceira ao confiar em nós a responsabilidade de realizar algo grande e com poucos recursos iniciais. Reunir mais de 230 pessoas durante todo o evento não é brincadeira em tempos tão desafiadores como o nosso.” Destacou Arthur. O congresso recebeu pessoas das Dioceses Meridional, Paraná, Rio de Janeiro, Recife, Amazônia, São Paulo, Distrito Missionário, bem como a presença de pessoas de diversos estados: Rio Grande do Sul, Santa Catarina, Paraná, Rio de Janeiro, Mato Grosso do Sul, Minas Gerais, Maranhão, Rio Grande do Norte, Ceará, Pernambuco, Alagoas, Bahia, Espírito Santo, Goiás, Brasília e Pará. Gente que de outros países como Escócia, EUA e Argentina.

Rev. Carla E. Roland Guzmán, PhD, Rector Episcopal Church of St. Matthew and St. Timothy

De acordo com a Reverenda Carla E. Roland Guzmán, da Igreja Episcopal dos Estados Unidos e coordenadora da Fé, família, Igualdade: latinx Roundtable (um programa de CLGS) O insight e a complexidade das apresentações e participação foram inigualáveis, mesmo em comparação com outros congressos em todo o mundo. As perspectivas teológica, acadêmica e de base, contextual, interseccional, pastoral e libertadora da comunidade foram abordadas a partir de uma variedade de perspectivas progressistas, ecumênicas e inter-religiosas. “Para a Comunhão Anglicana e outros contextos, o congresso deve ser visto como um modelo de como abordar, em diálogo, uma conversa de direitos LGBTI + em todo o mundo, de uma perspectiva religiosa, social e política. Isso permite que posições teológicas progressistas sobre questões LGBTI+ tenham um espaço que possa desafiar os diálogos discursivos sequestrados pela direita.” disse Guzmán.

O evento correu na semana da Parada LGBTI+ de São Paulo, que este ano comemorou os 50 anos de Stonewall, diversos religiosos e pessoas ligadas a comunidades inclusivas participaram , no domingo, da Parada  no “Bloco Gente de Fé” contra a lgbtifobia.  Ao final foi redigida a  Carta de São Paulo e realizada a celebração de todas as Fés. Texto: Nilo Junior, Secretaria Geral Fotos do Congresso